Privacy Statement


The University of Iowa Center for Advancement is committed to being a responsible steward of your personal information and ensuring it is collected, used, and secured appropriately. This Privacy Statement summarizes our policy and practices as it relates to your personal information.

If you have any questions or comments about our privacy practices or compliance efforts, please contact Dana Larson, executive director of marketing and communication, at 1-800-982-4295 or email privacy@foriowa.org.

PERSONAL INFORMATION AND HOW WE COLLECT IT

The UI Center for Advancement collects personal information to fulfill our organizational mission of advancing the University of Iowa through engagement and philanthropy and to provide you with the best experience with our websites, services, and programs. Personal information is collected as provided voluntarily by you (e.g., when you send an address update or make a gift online), through your use of our services (e.g., how you interact with our websites and emails), and from our use of third-party sources (e.g., publicly available sources or by searching the Internet).

Information You Provide. We collect personal information directly from you via forms, surveys, subscriptions, constituent portals, event registrations, or donation forms. You can choose whether to provide this information; however, providing personal information on a voluntary basis may be necessary for certain services (e.g., making a gift, registering for an event, or joining a mailing list).

The type of personal information that we may collect from you includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Name and contact details including full name, mailing addresses, phone numbers, and email addresses
  • Date of birth
  • Names of spouse/partner and family members
  • Education history/degree and graduation information
  • Employment information and title
  • Information related to your charitable donations to the UI Center for Advancement
  • Membership in groups or organizations
  • Social media handles
  • Other information you provide about yourself voluntarily (e.g., current interests, volunteering activities and expression of interest in volunteering, etc.)

Information Collected Through Your Use of Our Services. We manage several websites to maintain contact with alumni, donors, and friends of the UI. In general, when you visit our websites and access information, you remain anonymous. We track web usage to evaluate how well our web pages are reaching and serving the needs of visitors. There are occasions when we will ask for additional information from you. We do this to better understand and respond to your needs and to provide you with services that may be valuable to you. We also use cookies, pixel tags, and/or other similar technologies to collect visitor information (e.g., third-party tracking tools and server logs).

Cookies. Cookies are small text files that collect information about website activity. The UI Center for Advancement sites use cookies for two primary purposes—to carry info about your current site visit from one page to the next and to recognize you and remember your preferences on any subsequent visits. You can disable cookies by changing preference settings in your web browser. You can use most of our websites with cookies disabled but may find that some functions require cookies.

Pixel tags. Also called web beacons, web bugs, or clear GIFs, pixel tags are tiny image files that may be used to monitor website use. Disabling cookies in your web browser preferences will prevent pixel tags from collecting any unique information. Pixel tags also may be used to track whether you open email messages we send. You can disable some pixel tags by turning off HTML display or images in your email software.

Third-party tracking tools. Some of our websites use third-party tracking tools to monitor and improve sites or to provide ads and other information that may be of interest to users. These tools may collect the following information:

  • Internet protocol (IP) address for your computer/device
  • Internet service provider
  • Website from which you arrived
  • Operating system and web browser software
  • Date and time of your visit
  • Pages you visit on this site
  • Terms you use in our site’s search engines

Third-party tools like Google Analytics help website administrators track site usage, understand how users find sites, and improve website function and content. Other third-party tools show UI Center for Advancement advertisements on sites across the web. Using cookies and related technologies, these tools show ads to people who have previously visited our websites or might be interested in our sites based on other sites visited. You can opt out of these services through Google advertising opt out and Network Advertising Initiative opt out.

Server logs. Like third-party tracking tools, our web servers routinely generate logs that include basic information helpful in monitoring website usage and performance:

  • Internet Protocol (IP) address
  • Web browser software and plugins
  • Date and time of your visit
  • Path taken through our sites
  • Files downloaded and time spent accessing video or audio files
  • Any errors you encounter

Information Collected from Third-Party Sources. We may gather information about you from publicly available sources (e.g., government databases), Internet searches, and other third-party sources (e.g., data brokers from which we purchase data to supplement our alumni and donor records). We also obtain information from the UI, campus partners, alumni chapters and clubs, and select individuals and entities for alumni relations and development purposes. We may combine this information with the personal and other information we have collected about you. This helps us understand more about you and your interests in supporting the UI, including financially, and to understand the preferences of our alumni, donors, and friends about attendance at events, communications, and services.

HOW WE USE THE PERSONAL INFORMATION WE COLLECT

The UI Center for Advancement is committed to reaching everyone who has an affinity with, passion to support, or desire to advance the UI through programming, events, and opportunities to give back. The personal information you provide, or we collect, allows us to operate our business, connect/communicate with you on a more personal level, and offer you the most appropriate and meaningful experience, services, and connection with the UI.

Operating Our Business. The UI Center for Advancement was formed to better serve alumni, donors, and friends of the UI. We are a separately incorporated [Iowa nonprofit], 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, recognized by the UI as the preferred channel to (1) raise, receive, and manage charitable funds exclusively for its benefit, and (2) strengthen ties between the UI and its alumni, students, friends, fans, and current and future donors by offering engagement programming, events, and opportunities to give back. For these reasons, the UI Center for Advancement stores and maintains contact and personal information of alumni, donors, and friends to the UI.

Communicating with You. The UI Center for Advancement uses personal information it collects to communicate with you on its own behalf or on behalf of the UI and its colleges, departments, units, affiliated organizations, volunteer clubs, student organizations, etc. We will use your information to keep in touch with you about UI-related activities and developments, events on campus and within your geographic region, alumni services and involvement opportunities, publications and campus information, as well as to request and process donations. We may contact you by phone, mail, email, or other means. If you want to update your contact preferences or opt-out of future communications, please visit our preferences page or contact us at 1-800-982-4295.

Processing Donations. The UI Center for Advancement collects personal information to process your donations or payments. We do not store any credit/debit card details within our database.

Personalizing Your Experience. The UI Center for Advancement uses your personal information and what we know about you to deliver services and content customized to you and your preferences. For example, if we know that you are a graduate of a particular college at the UI and have indicated attendance at theater or performing arts events, we may customize content sent or communicated to you or viewable by you on our website or social media based on these interests.

Improving our Products and Services. The UI Center for Advancement manages several websites and tracks web usage to evaluate how well our web pages are reaching and serving the needs of visitors and to make improvements, as needed. We also perform analytics concerning your use of our online services, including your responses to our emails and the pages and advertisements you view. There are occasions when we will ask for additional information from you. We do this to better understand and respond to your needs, and to develop new products and services that may be valuable to you.

Remarketing. The UI Center for Advancement may use the information we collect from you or through third-party sources to select and deliver some of the ads you see from us. We remarket for the purpose of extending our message to you and delivering a more personalized experience.

WHAT WE DISCLOSE TO OTHERS AND WHY

We may share the personal information we collect from and about you within our organization and with certain third parties. For example, we may share your information with:

  • The UI, including but not limited to, certain representatives in its colleges, departments, units, affiliated organizations, volunteer clubs, and student organizations for alumni relations and development purposes;
  • Third parties to comply with legal requirements such as the demands of applicable subpoenas and court orders; to verify or enforce our rights, or other applicable policies; to address fraud, security, or technical issues; to respond to an emergency; or otherwise to protect the rights, property, or security of our employees or users; and
  • Service Providers we work with or engage to assist us in providing services, research, products, or programs we determine would provide a benefit to you or our business operations. Examples of when we might utilize service providers include, but are not limited to, payment/donation processors; contact information maintenance; market segmentation, which may include asset screening and predictive modeling; and marketing services.

YOUR CHOICES

We value your trust and want to assure you that we will always strive to be responsible in our management of your personal information. You have a choice about whether you want to receive information about the UI, including engagement activities or fundraising initiatives, and which methods of communication we use to contact you. If you want to update your contact preferences or opt-out of future communications, please visit our preferences page or contact us at 1-800-982-4295.

Furthermore, if you wish to access, correct, update, or remove your personal information (such as your address) from our constituent database, please contact 1-800-982-4295 or email privacy@foriowa.org. The UI Center for Advancement will consider all requests from individuals regarding their personal information. If required by law, we will grant a request to delete personal information, but you should note that in many situations we must keep your personal information to comply with our legal obligations, enforce our agreements, or for another one of our business purposes. If you are an individual residing within the European Union, please see our Notice of GDPR rights for more information on your rights with respect to our processing and use your personal information.

HOW WE SAFEGUARD THE INFORMATION

While we use reasonable efforts to protect your personal information from unauthorized access, use, or disclosure, we cannot guarantee the security of your personal information as no method of transmission over the Internet or method of electronic storage is fully secure. In the event we are required by law to inform you of a breach to your personal information, we will notify you electronically, in writing, or by telephone, if legally permitted.

We take these and other steps to help ensure our systems are secure and available.

  • Monitor our internal systems 24 hours a day.
  • Log all system activity so we can validate data at any time.
  • Encrypt all data in transit, encrypt personal health information at rest and in transit, and encrypt all data on laptops.
  • Require two-factor authentication by all employees.
  • Have a redundant data center in case one data center becomes unavailable.
  • Employ "ethical hackers" to test attack models within our network.
  • Require vendors to maintain compliance with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard and the Payment Application Data Security Standard.
  • Limit access to only those who need to have access to your information and require confidentiality.
  • Require an access card to enter our buildings.
  • Conduct security awareness training for our staff and volunteers.

RETENTION PRACTICES

We believe a connection with the UI is not a one-time event and continues over a lifetime of an alumni, friend, fan, donor, and potential donor. As a result, our retention practice reflects our continued mission to keep those with an affinity to the UI connected so we retain your information until you inform us of your desire that we no longer use your personal information and/or seek removal of your personal information from our constituent database.

CHANGES TO OUR PRIVACY STATEMENT

We may change this Privacy Statement from time to time. Any material changes to this Privacy Statement will be posted on this page and will take effect as soon as it has been updated.

This Privacy Statement was last updated as of January 2021.

CONTACT US

If you have any questions or comments about our privacy practices or compliance efforts, please contact Dana Larson, executive director of marketing and communications, at 800-648-6973 or mail privacy@foriowa.org.

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L.A.-based artist Charles Ray to receive CLAS Alumni Fellow award, give talks this month. Unpainted sculpture by Charles Ray, 1997, fiberglass and paint, 60x78x171 inches. Photograph by Josh White and courtesy of the Matthew Marks Gallery. Charles Ray (75BFA) was walking through the UI physics and astronomy department one day when he came across an inspiring scene. Ray, an art student whose curiosity extended far beyond the studio, hoped to hitch a ride out to the observatory for some evening stargazing. Instead, he found a group of students constructing a satellite bound for a space mission. "It just blew my mind," recalls Ray. Just as mind-blowing were the sculptures Ray was creating across the river, years before he would establish himself as one of the world's most important artists. For one physics-defying piece, he fashioned a 2,000-pound slab of concrete atop a slender tree trunk. For another, he dropped a massive wrecking ball onto a crumpled steel plate, as if Sputnik had just crashed outside the old Art Building. Charles Ray "It was such a formative experience for me," the Los Angeles-based sculptor says of his time in Iowa City. "It did something to my soul and my brain. Even though I was young, the university and my mentors gave me a great deal of independence. My curiosity was endless." A professor emeritus at the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture, Ray returns to campus this month to speak and receive the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences' Alumni Fellow award. Rather than just waxing nostalgic about his time at Iowa, Ray has organized a three-day lecture series April 16-18 with two fellow art scholars. Iowa native Graham Harman, a philosophy professor at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, will open the series by discussing his theory of aesthetics known as object-oriented ontology. On the second day, Ray will speak about the nature of sculptural objects. And Richard Neer, an art historian at the University of Chicago, will bookend the series by lecturing on the question of provenance, or art's origin. Ray will also give a separate public lecture April 17 in Art Building West titled "My Soul is an Object." Recognized as one of the leading artists of his generation, Ray is known for his strange and enigmatic sculptures so loaded with nods to the past that they've been called "catnip for art historians." His 2014 Horse and Rider, for example, is a 10-ton solid stainless steel work in the tradition of a war memorial, but depicts the artist slouch-shouldered atop a weary nag. Ray is also famous for his wry re-imaginings of familiar objects, like the 47-foot-long replica of a red toy fire truck that he parked in front of New York's Whitney Museum of American Art for a 1993 biennial exhibition. Ray and his studio team often spend years working on a given piece, which can fetch as much as seven figures at auction. His sculptures can be found at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Art Institute of Chicago, among other major U.S. museums. Ray is currently preparing for a retrospective show in Paris next year?one of several upcoming international exhibitions. Isabel Barbuzza, UI associate professor of sculpture, describes Ray's work as beautiful and witty, while using scale in unexpected ways. Ray's 8-foot-tall Boy with Frog?commissioned for a prominent spot in Venice, Italy, then removed after some controversy (a version now stands outside the Getty Museum in Los Angeles)?is among Barbuzza's favorites. "His sculptures have a presence you can only see when you're in front of the work," she says. "They're very moving, and to me it's interesting what happens with scale?the viewer relates to the piece in a very profound way." Steve McGuire (83MA, 90PhD), director of the School of Art and Art History, says few others have contributed more to contemporary art than Ray. "This is a big deal for us to be able to celebrate his career," McGuire says of presenting Ray with the alumni fellow award. "I think it's pretty meaningful to him, and of course it's really meaningful for our school." A Chicago native, Ray arrived at Iowa as a gifted artist but hardly a model student. Ray's dyslexia made schoolwork a chore, and his parents had sent him to military school with the hopes of straightening out his academics. It was at the UI, however, where he finally found his language in the studio and, in turn, his footing in the classroom. "Through the syntax of sculpture, I could express myself intellectually for the first time," Ray says. "That gave me a kind of confidence." Ray studied under UI art school pillars like Wallace Tomasini, Julius Schmidt, and Hans Breder. But it was his bond with Roland Brenner?a South African professor and former pupil of sculptor Anthony Caro?that proved to be the most influential. Ray still remembers his first sculpture in Brenner's class, a steel configuration with long stems and discs at the end. Its bouquet-like resemblance didn't sit well with Brenner. "That showed me you made something, but didn't want to discover something," Ray recalls Brenner telling him. "Don't ever do that in my class again." The two would become lifelong friends. Iowa City is a different place today than the 1970s, particularly the transformation of the arts campus after the flood of 2008, Ray says. Still, his visits back to campus over the years always remind him of those crisp and clear Iowa nights at the observatory and gazing out the studio window while exploring the frontiers of sculpture. "It feels like you can see right through the galaxy when you look up," Ray says. Handheld bird by Charles Ray, 2006, painted steel, 2x4x3 inches The UI is home to six pieces by Ray, all found in the Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building and displayed through the university's Art on Campus program. Among them is Handheld bird, a tiny but ornate piece depicting a creature in an embryonic state. Lunchtime Lecture Series What: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences fellow Charles Ray and two guest art scholars?Graham Harman and Richard Neer?will deliver a series of public lectures this month at the UI. When, where: 12:20 p.m. April 16?18 at Art Building West, room 240, 141 N. Riverside Drive, Iowa City More information: events.uiowa.edu/26915 My Soul is an Object: Artist Talk with Charles Ray What: A public lecture by renowned sculptor and UI alumnus Charles Ray When, where: 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 17, at Art Building West, room 240, 141 N. Riverside Drive, Iowa City More about Ray: charlesraysculpture.com/ Support the UI School of Art and Art History

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