Student Philanthropy and Grants Opportunities


At the University of Iowa, alumni and friends have built a culture of philanthropy that we call Hawkeyes Give Back. This represents a desire to contribute to campus and the world through time, talent, and treasure.

The idea of Hawkeyes Give Back is everywhere at Iowa—from learning in classrooms and researching in labs, to building state-of-the-art facilities and giving back in our communities.

We offer many opportunities for Hawkeyes to engage with philanthropy and learn how it positively impacts their college experience.


Philanthropy Lecture Series

Each spring and fall, an Iowa alum or friend returns to campus to share their story about how they give back and empower others. These programs inspire students and the broader campus community to incorporate philanthropy into their lives.

Student Advancement Network

Current Iowa students who join the Student Advancement Network (SAN) serve as representatives of the student body for alumni and donors. Members also educate their peers about the importance of philanthropy and engagement, their different forms, and how they enhance the college experience.

For more information, follow SAN on Facebook and Instagram or email student.advancement@foriowa.org.

Student Impact Grants

Student Impact Grants provide funding for undergraduate and graduate student activities outside of the classroom, like research, travel, and service projects. The goal of the grant is to enable students to pursue opportunities that might not otherwise be possible without financial assistance. The grants are made possible by a partnership between the University of Iowa Office of the President and Student Advancement Network (SAN).

Volunteer Opportunities

Hawkeyes can give the gift of time by signing up for unique volunteer opportunities on campus, supporting areas such as Hancher and University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics.

Fellowship and Internships

Iowa students and recent graduates are invited to apply for a yearlong post-grad fellowship or summer internship.

Williams Fellowship

In this one-year, full-time paid position with benefits, the Williams Fellow can “test drive” a career in philanthropy and alumni engagement by working at the University of Iowa Center for Advancement. The fellow develops a better understanding of the organization by rotating through its various departments.

Applications are typically accepted starting in January with a February deadline.

Summer Internships

Summer internships provide a meaningful opportunity for Iowa students to learn about the impact alumni engagement and philanthropic support has on their university, while also exploring their career goals within a nonprofit or higher education setting. This eleven-week, full-time, paid experience provides opportunities for students with a variety of career aspirations.

Applications are typically accepted at the beginning of the spring semester.

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No matter where you are, you're always a Hawkeye. Learn how the University of Iowa Center for Advancement can keep you connected to Iowa.

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