Student Philanthropy and Grants Opportunities


At the University of Iowa, alumni and friends have built a culture of philanthropy that we call Hawkeyes Give Back. This represents a desire to contribute to campus and the world through time, talent, and treasure.

The idea of Hawkeyes Give Back is everywhere at Iowa—from learning in classrooms and researching in labs, to building state-of-the-art facilities and giving back in our communities.

We offer many opportunities for Hawkeyes to engage with philanthropy and learn how it positively impacts their college experience.


Upcoming Events

Hawkeyes Give Back: National Philanthropy Day  

Monday, November 15

Hawkeyes are making a big impact here on campus and far beyond by lending our time, talent, treasure, ties, and tradition. Why? Because Hawkeyes Give Back. Join us on National Philanthropy Day to learn more. Limited seating available.

Sponsored by the Student Advancement Network.

11 a.m.–1 p.m.   
National Philanthropy Day Tent  
Pentacrest  
Stop by the National Philanthropy Day tent on the Pentacrest and test your knowledge (and win prizes) with the Iowa trivia wheel; write a thank you note to a UI donor; enjoy a cup of hot cocoa, and more!   
Sponsored by the Student Advancement Network and the Association of Fundraising Professionals Collegiate Chapter.

4 p.m.   
Hawkeyes Give Back: Philanthropy in Action with Cindy Heider  
Iowa Memorial Union – 166, Iowa Theater  
You're invited to learn more about the power of philanthropy in action through a conversation with Cindy Heider (86BBA). Heider will share her insights on philanthropy as a community volunteer, advocate, and vice president of the Heider Family Foundation. Following the speaker, enjoy some snacks and head to a workshop breakout with experts in philanthropy from the UI Center for Advancement!

5 p.m.   
National Philanthropy Day Workshop 
Iowa Memorial Union - Third Floor Meeting Rooms (check-in outside of room 348)
Navigating the world of events, fundraising, and philanthropic activities can be difficult. Learn strategies from experts at the UI Center for Advancement that you can implement in your career, volunteer activities, or student organization.    

Choose from five different workshop topics, which will each be offered twice in back-to-back 25-minute breakout sessions. Each session will include time for Q&A. Breakout room topics include "Event Planning," "Fundraising 101," "Building Relationships and Thanking Your Supporters," "The UI Center for Advancement – What Can We Do for You?", and "Crowdfunding with GOLDrush." 

6 p.m.   
Women and Philanthropy (virtual event) Watch Party  
Iowa Memorial Union – 166, Iowa Theater
Women have become game changers in the world of charitable donations—and they're helping to reshape philanthropy. Join us for a virtual conversation with some of the power players whose generosity has helped transform the University of Iowa. You'll hear from these visionary women—and learn how you can make a difference, too.

UI President Emerita Sally Mason will lead this discussion—with participants such as Linda Baker (68BA), Janice Ellig (68BBA), Mary Louise Petersen (51BA, 13LHD), and Mary Joy Stead. They will explore what inspires some of our most devoted female Hawkeyes to give back to Iowa. If you can't attend the watch party, register to attend virtually.


Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa–sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Holly Jones in advance at 319-467-3377 or Holly.Jones@ForIowa.org

Philanthropy Lecture Series

Each spring and fall, an Iowa alum or friend returns to campus to share their story about how they give back and empower others. These programs inspire students and the broader campus community to incorporate philanthropy into their lives.

Student Advancement Network

Current Iowa students who join the Student Advancement Network (SAN) serve as representatives of the student body for alumni and donors. Members also educate their peers about the importance of philanthropy and engagement, their different forms, and how they enhance the college experience.

For more information, follow SAN on Facebook and Instagram or email student.advancement@foriowa.org.

Student Impact Grants

Student Impact Grants provide funding for undergraduate and graduate student activities outside of the classroom, like research, travel, and service projects. The goal of the grant is to enable students to pursue opportunities that might not otherwise be possible without financial assistance. The grants are made possible by a partnership between the University of Iowa Office of the President and Student Advancement Network (SAN).

Volunteer Opportunities

Hawkeyes can give the gift of time by signing up for unique volunteer opportunities on campus, supporting areas such as Hancher and University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics.

Fellowship and Internships

Iowa students and recent graduates are invited to apply for a yearlong post-grad fellowship or summer internship.

Williams Fellowship

In this one-year, full-time paid position with benefits, the Williams Fellow can “test drive” a career in philanthropy and alumni engagement by working at the University of Iowa Center for Advancement. The fellow develops a better understanding of the organization by rotating through its various departments.

Applications are typically accepted starting in January with a February deadline.

Summer Internships

Summer internships provide a meaningful opportunity for Iowa students to learn about the impact alumni engagement and philanthropic support has on their university, while also exploring their career goals within a nonprofit or higher education setting. This eleven-week, full-time, paid experience provides opportunities for students with a variety of career aspirations.

Applications are typically accepted at the beginning of the spring semester.

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An Iowa law professor shares his insights into what the storming of the Capitol by pro-Trump insurrectionists could mean for America. Derek T. Muller Members of Congress evacuated the House and Senate chambers on Jan. 6 as a mob of supporters of President Donald Trump raided the U.S. Capitol to protest the certification of the 2020 presidential election results. Following a Trump rally, rioters scaled walls, broke windows, and gained access to the Senate floor and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office. At least five people died in the clash between rioters and law enforcement. Iowa Magazine interviewed Derek T. Muller, a professor and election law expert at the University of Iowa College of Law, to learn how these events could affect our democracy's future. Is there any precedent in American history for what's occurring during this transfer of power? It's hard to find any historical comparisons to 2021. In 1860, the election of Abraham Lincoln was enough to cause secession. And other presidents have been fairly sore losers, leaving town without attending the inauguration. But there's never been a sustained attempt like this by a president to seek to overturn the election results, to deny the legitimacy of the president-elect's victory, or to incite a mob to 'fight' for him like this. Was the Capitol breach a threat to democracy? Political violence is a great danger to democracy. We rely on the public's trust in the legitimacy of elections. Storming the Capitol and disrupting legislators during their official business of counting electoral votes is a worrisome sign for future elections. What crimes could those who stormed the Capitol be charged with? Rioters might be charged with assault or vandalism. More serious might be seditious conspiracy, defined as seeking to hinder or delay the execution of any law of the United States or by force taking away property. What is the 25th Amendment, and could it be applied to this situation? The 25th Amendment is a mechanism to ensure a transition of power in the event the president is unable to discharge his duties. It has been used twice for a temporary and voluntary transition of power when a president has undergone surgery. Another untested provision allows the vice president and a majority of the cabinet to write to Congress that the president is unable to perform his duties, in which case the vice president immediately becomes acting president. The president could then assert that no inability exists, and the vice president and the cabinet could argue again that he is unable. Congress would need to vote within 21 days by a two-thirds vote in both houses that the president is unable in order for the vice president to continue his duties. If invoked, the assumption is it would 'run out the clock' until Jan. 20. The provision was principally designed for situations where the president was incapacitated, like an assassination attempt in which he slipped into a coma. It would be a novel and significant thing for the vice president and cabinet to invoke it in cases like this. Do you think President Trump's role in the Capitol riot could lead to impeachment? Impeachment seems unlikely because Congress is not in session and would need to move quickly. The House could adopt articles of impeachment by a simple majority vote. The facts are straightforward, so there wouldn't need to be an extensive investigation to gather facts. It would then go to the Senate for a trial, which could remove the president by a two-thirds vote. It could also bar him from serving in any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States, effectively preventing him from becoming president again. It's also possible, if untested, to impeach him after he has left office, which would allow Congress to vote to bar him from future government service. Do you think the events that unfolded at the Capitol on Jan. 6 might lead to any changes in federal election law? It remains unclear how Congress might respond to this as a matter of federal election law. The Electoral Count Act of 1887?the statute under which Congress was counting electoral votes?allows objections like those lodged in Congress, and a small change in the future might make objections harder. In a broader sense, Congress might be more inclined to support H.R. 1, an omnibus election bill that requires independent redistricting commissions and campaign finance changes, but it's not clear if those changes could pass the filibuster in the Senate or would instill public confidence in elections. Statehood for the District of Columbia, after experiencing an out-of-control riot like this with fewer resources than it needed, may also be a more pressing issue and would add two senators and one representative from the District to Congress. What might the events of Jan. 6 mean for the future of our elections? It will take a long time to assess the fallout of these riots. Distrust in our elections is very high among a significant segment of the population right now, and some Republicans in Congress are encouraging that distrust. It is very hard to think of a productive way forward if the losing side in an election cannot accept losing.

Whether you ended up across the state or across the ocean since your time at Iowa, you can meet fellow Hawkeyes through volunteer-led clubs and alumni affinity groups.

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